The Indian Girls in Trouble
Ali Sukhanver
8/12/2012

 

A few weeks back, The Times of India published an article “Shame: Delhi still India’s rape capital”. This article by V Narayan says, “Delhi continues to be the rape capital of the country, followed by Mumbai. Delhi registered 568 cases of rape, compared to 218 in Mumbai in 2011, National Crime Records Bureau (NCRB) statistics showed. In the period of 2007-2011, Delhi topped the chart, followed by Mumbai, Bhopal, Pune and Jaipur.” This article was very much shocking and disappointing for me because it reminded me of a renaming ceremony held somewhere in late 2011, in a central Indian district of Mumbai. In that ceremony more than 200 Indian girls chose new names for them just to give a fresh start to their life. These were the girls whose names meant “unwanted” or “disliked” in Hindi language. The Indian media took that event as the beginning of a revolution regarding the sorry plight of women in India.

A few weeks back, The Times of India published an article “Shame: Delhi still India’s rape capital”. This article by V Narayan says, “Delhi continues to be the rape capital of the country, followed by Mumbai. Delhi registered 568 cases of rape, compared to 218 in Mumbai in 2011, National Crime Records Bureau (NCRB) statistics showed. In the period of 2007-2011, Delhi topped the chart, followed by Mumbai, Bhopal, Pune and Jaipur.” This article was very much shocking and disappointing for me because it reminded me of a renaming ceremony held somewhere in late 2011, in a central Indian district of Mumbai. In that ceremony more than 200 Indian girls chose new names for them just to give a fresh start to their life. These were the girls whose names meant “unwanted” or “disliked” in Hindi language. The Indian media took that event as the beginning of a revolution regarding the sorry plight of women in India.